PIETECH Page 12, Happy New Year (Thank God 2020 is Over, Let’s Move Forward!!!)

As 2020 comes to a close, I look forward to what 2021 will bring. “Normal” life was suspended, the MSM news cannot seem to find anything to report that doesn’t have a carefully scripted narrative, alternative news sources have come under fire from big tech and the MSM, but those of us quietly building, designing and experimenting found the slow-down to be a productive time.

It has been a strange year but there has been a great deal of progress by “amateur” researchers and experimenters, so I thought it only right to recap some of the more important inertial & gyroscopic propulsion findings of 2020.

From esteemed engineering professionals to a host of virtually unknown tinkerers (me) and from all parts of the world, approaches to building a fully functional inertial drive system are quite varied but the experiments publicly presented have erased all doubt that this is a valid (although infant) technology which will soon be a budding mainstream industry.

Early in 2020, the early evidence presented and posted on video platforms such as YouTube and BitChute was still drawing a LOT of negative attention from some “learned” “experts” who unequivocally argued that all working units are fakes designed to defraud the unlearned public. Most of these demonstrations were genuine, and many of the online attackers were nothing more than “trolls” attempting to keep honest people from discovering anything meaningful. I am not going to speak for the many brilliant people who have designs of their own, I will only mention the work I have done over the last 12+ months.

In 2019, I had finally built a proof of principal gyroscopic design of my own design when I happened upon the work of Roy Thornson. I saw his design as a highly workable and developable device that should be replicated and improved. So I shelved (but kept intact) my initial work and switched to the Thornson design. I downloaded everything I could find, bought every available technical reference, and eventually even contacted someone who knew Roy personally. Within a month or two, I had a Thornson based replica that could self-propel across a workbench and I was “hooked”.

I decided that because I had built a working model that could easily “go missing”, the safest way to keep both it and me safe was to make every step public, free, and open source. So all the building steps were posted to a blog (this blog) and the machinery itself video recorded and publicly released. I hope that my work can help someone else with their journey.

The things I learned and overcame regarding inertial propulsion are all posted publicly, but here is a recap (I’m sure there are things I missed):

How to make steel spur gears, cheap enough to be disposable.

How to attach automotive flexplates to bearings for the main wheels.

How to make different types of swinging weights.

How important the inner stop is, it does not work without it!

How to make the outer stop a part of the planet gear.

How a slipping belt can cause it to stop thrusting (chains are better).

How different configurations of gears affect performance.

How different timing affects performance and is different for hybrid use.

How a dead blow weight design enhances performance.

How performance is affected by counter rotating wheels.

How to effectively use as a hybrid “helper” drive.

How to make better steel gears.

How to select the correct drive motor.

How to write a manual.

How to build a website.

How to ignore (and delete) negative comments.

How important it is to have friends who understand inertial propulsion (thanks Tokio).

How an eccentric gear design can enhance performance.

How important it is to listen to and commune with my God.

I also learned a whole lot about what does NOT work!!!

There are probably more items to add… Read the blog & watch the videos for details including some failed tests, early tests, designs that work, and designs that don’t.

I already have 2 design changes in mind for the first part of 2021, it should be exciting! I hope others get busy building too! I also hope everyone stays safe. Happy New Year!

PIETECH Page 11, PIE 4.6 Eccentric Drive Gearing

12/23/20 PIETECH Page 11, PIE 4.6 Eccentric Drive Gearing

I was going to be putting my effort into duplicating the dead blow weight so that I can test the first wheel with 2 weights, and I can build a second wheel to go with the first one. However, when I was doing the propulsion testing with the single wheel, I noticed that as by battery started running down propulsion was diminishing. This was found to be a “slow-down” of the motor during the critical “power-stroke” (those who have read my manual know what that means) causing propulsion loss. To compensate, I manually turned the knob on the speed controller during slow speed operation. Naturally, I did not meet the correct RPM every time, but I noticed that if I overshot the running RPM at exactly the right moment, the PIE 4.6 would lurch forward much stronger.

A friend of mine, who also has been working on his own inertial propulsion drive (YouTube Channel) and I were discussing this. It has been found that changing the time base in mid or quarter turns of the main wheel could enhance the propulsion effect dramatically.

My choices for this concept are to either electrically change the RPMs back and forth or use eccentric gearing to smoothly transition the RPMs thus changing the time base. In the end I may try them both or perhaps someone could find a better method.

For now, I have started this experiment with the eccentric gear setup. Eccentric gears are essentially a pair (or more) of identical gears or sprockets, with their axle’s not on center in the exact same amount. Since each will “wobble” exactly the same amount, they can be meshed together. When one it rotated at a steady RPM by an outside source (electric motor, etc.) the other one accelerates through half of its rotation and decelerates through the other half.

Eccentric Gear (Sprocket) Set

So, for my experiment I have 2 identical sprockets, each mounted on-center and each on a bearing. Then there are two more identical sprockets fastened parallel with the first ones, each mounted exactly the same amount off-center. The two off-center (or eccentric) sprockets are timed and connected together with roller chain.

Sprocket set 1 is driven by the electric motor. Sprocket set 2 is connected to the PIE 4.6 wheel. As the motor turns at a steady RPM, the PIE 4.6 is accelerating and decelerating constantly. This is timed to start the acceleration approximately halfway through the portion of the cycle when the weight is in contact with the center (inner stop) axle. Timing here is very important and even a few teeth off on the sprocket to wheel timing makes a huge difference. In fact, it has been observed that with the timing off too much, the unit would oscillate forward AND back with significant force.


Eccentric Drive Ready For Testing (Timing Was Not Correct In Picture)

Eccentric Drive Testing (Yellow Marks are for Timing Reference)

Eccentric Drive Testing (Yellow Marks are for Timing Reference)

I know that this design will not be well suited to having multiple weights on the wheel, but I do have a goal in mind that I am not ready to introduce just yet. If this idea works out, it would be capable of enhancing the operation of any of the PIE versions.

Demo of Eccentric Gears Driving the PIE 4.6

The downside is; if I only have 1 weight per wheel the RPM is limited due to transverse (sideways) forces threatening to tear it apart.

First Propulsion Bench Test for PIE 4.6

I had intended to wait and do the first true propulsion test on the 4.6 on a proper set of bearings or wheels, but I found myself with a few minutes of free time so I went into my lab area to think about “next moves” & decided that I simply wanted to see it move on its own.

So, it was nothing fancy and the battery was not “riding” along with it. No numerical data was recorded either. I simply placed two short (about 12”) lengths of ½” (12mm) conduit under the PIE 4.6 which would allow it to move freely forward and backward.

PIE 4.6 First Propulsion Test

The RPMs were slowly brought up from zero and as soon as the weight started to swing properly the PIE 4.6 moved forward only, and with a great deal of authority. I was VERY pleased, and I was truly amazed at the lack of backward movement which I am attributing to the dead blow design. I will be posting a video very soon (might be posted by the time this is being read) so please check my YouTube & BitChute channels. https://www.youtube.com/user/stclairtechrd  and https://www.bitchute.com/channel/miGkQfBM24NZ/

I will be making a couple more of these amazing Dead Blow Weights with its attached Guide (DB-G) as soon as possible so that I can see if the 4.6 will still move properly with multiple planet gears using the DB-G. From there, multiple wheels would be on the agenda along with experimentation much like those performed with the 1.0 and 2.0 such as synchronous rotation vs. counter-synchronous rotation etcetera.

It has been mentioned that the slow progress and multiple videos posted with little success tend to be frustrating. This is the methodology employed by the scientific community and by professional Model Makers worldwide.  Even though I know what I want to build, taking these slow and methodical steps allow me to eliminate component designs with inferior performance and focus on those designs with more promise. The more successful designs, to which I am adding the PIE 4.6, are the fruit of this painfully slow methodology. Regardless of anyone else’s personal beliefs (all are welcome to their own beliefs) I also acknowledge a divine inspiration fueling my own personal path of growth in this lifetime.

PIETECH Page 9 – PIE 4.5 With New Dead Blow Type Weight

The latest test of the PIE 4.5 is using a 1 kg dead blow type weight. The weight is a steel box with steel shot (BB’s) inside it. It appears to have a lot of promise, as there is virtually no “bounce” when the weight hits the inner stop, and it seems to be dampened where it would contact the outer stop if it had one (has not been installed).

PIE 4.5 with Dead Blow
Dead Blow Weight Installed On PIE 4.5

There is a video of this first testing on YouTube and BitChute. The problem however remained that the centrifugal force and impact force did not push in the same direction, which was the reason for Thornson’s “Inner Planet Trap” which would hold the weight and release at the correct time.

The answer is to install a “guide” on the end of the weight which would keep the weight near the center axle and correct the problem of thrusting in two different directions. This is proving , so far, to be a much improved design. This can also be seen on YouTube and BitChute.

Guide Fastened to Dead Blow Weight

These improvements are now bringing the PIE version up to “PIE 4.6”.

PIE 4.6 – Dead Blow Weight and Guide

Check out the videos on YouTube and BitChute & thanks for watching!

https://www.youtube.com/user/stclairtechrd

https://www.bitchute.com/channel/miGkQfBM24NZ/

PIE 4.5 and My Original Thornson Drive Replication

Hi everyone and welcome to my blog’s new home. I hope that this venue will be of at least the same quality as before, and I really hope that the text is a bit easier to read!

I posted a video on YouTube & BitChute of the PIE 4.5 with 3 gears, 2 gears and just one planet gear on it. There is a bit of controversy as to which is better and what configuration should be considered for the PIE 4.5 to continue. Watch the video and you can plainly see the lack of propulsion with better balance (3 planet gears), and much better propulsion with a fully unbalanced wheel (1 planet gear). Of course, getting rid of the jerking nature of the drive is a primary goal along with stronger propulsive force.

I have gone back and reviewed my recorded data, and videos, going all the way back to the very first truly functioning drive still being referred to as a Thornson Drive even though the stop modifications were already being changed and modified to the design finally used in the PIE system. The wheels (4 of them) all had a single planet gear, they were all running more or less in-sync, and it just plain worked. I am going to put the 3 videos I have of this original unit together into one video and post in soon.

Keeping this in mind, and knowing that I really can get a MUCH stronger forward pulse without increasing the back pulse, the goal remains to pulse smoothly (an oxymoron). For this plan to work, I need 2 or more complete PIE units that produce fairly equal amounts of force and that can run in-sync (with a calculated offset) without actually being physically mounted to the same frame.

Stay tuned to this blog and my video channels as I think some exciting things should be happening soon!

PIETECH P.6 – Web Site Active, Manual is Ready, 3-planet System Testing, & Possible Changes to the Weights

The Web Site

 The web site is officially up and running! I am definitely not a web page builder, but thanks to some awesome open source software (Open Element) and a very cost effective web hosting company (https://www.hostens.com) who also offer a suite of programs free with the service, www.stclairtech.tech is live.

Eventually this blog may migrate to the www.stclairtech.tech site.

The Manual

The PIE BUILDER’S MANUAL is complete as well and there are links to it from the stclairtech web site. I have listed it on eBay either as a downloadable PDF formatted e-book or as a paper manual. The paper manual also includes the downloadable version and they both come with links to exclusive manual “companion videos”.

The PIE 4.3

The PIE 4.3 has the new motor installed, and the RPMs are just where I expected them to be. The 24v motor is very strong and seems to do a great job of maintaining a stable speed under load. I thought I was ready to build the second wheel, but building the web site gave me some time to think. There are some modifications and variations I want to explore and experiment with as the building continues.

1st I definitely want to try an odd number of planet gears. One gear works better than tow, so I need to see if that is going to continue to change results as the number of gears increases.

2nd I want to add an electrical circuit to the drive motor that can instantly vary the speed it runs. Since I know that if it is allowed to slow when the weight is leaving the center and accelerating in velocity (power stroke) the thrust is dramatically reduced, it stands to reason that inverting this RPM drop into an RPM increase may lead to better results. This could be somewhat accomplished with matching offset drive sprockets, but I think that faster translations between speeds may be more effective….

3rd I want to increase the efficiency of the weights… But how? The answer to this may have already been answered more than 85 years ago by Mr. Harry W. Bull of Syracuse, NY with a device he called the “Propulsor”. This led to an OMG moment…

OMG Moment:

The H.W. Bull “Propulsor”:

In January of 1935 Harry W. Bull of Syracuse NY was featured in a Popular Science article for his invention known as a “Reaction Motor” which came to be known as the “Propulsor”. This design uses 2 equal weights that are slammed into opposite ends of a tube, one weight hits a solid stop while the other hits a “spring” stop. This creates a differential in the efficiency of the “stopping” of the weights. The solid hit creates sound and heat as waste energies while the “spring” end transmits the directional force more efficiently. Like the difference between a steel and a “dead-blow” hammer.

An interesting chapter in the professional life of Harry Bull is available online at http://epizodsspace.airbase.ru/bibl/inostr-yazyki/iaa/1989/Winter_Harry_Bull_American_Rocket_Pioneer.pdf  . On pages 308 & 309 of this volume of a much larger book, the propulsor is briefly discussed.

Of course, Mr. Bull’s work with the Propulsor was immediately rebuffed  by the “scholars” of the time and was publicly denounced as a “fallacious” in 1947, just as all other attempts at a reactionless drive have been and still are today.

Harry W. Bull Pendulum Testing

Basic Principal of Propulsor
 

Back to PIE 4.3

What if the PIE’s weights were “dead-blow”? Since a dead-blow hammer effectively transmits more force in every blow than a plain hammer because it has almost no “bounce-back”, I think that a similar design could be used for the weights which would then transmit their power more effectively with less wasted energy. The reason it transmits power more efficiently is because it lengthens the TIME the contact blow happens! Time, the length of time that virtually any impulse drive uses to produce directional force is a critical feature in successful operation!

3-Planet System

Current Work

Currently the PIE 4.3 has the option of 2 or 3 planet gears. The 3-gear design just makes sense to me, but testing will tell the story there. There is a motor speed controller currently ordered and I am building more weights to experiment with. 

I have just begun testing the 3-planet set-up and I will post more as I go, but there is a video of an initial test run available on YouTube and BitChute (links below).

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii1l8W9-8nQ

BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/5pmnbyhLKRcJ/

PIETECH P. 5 – Upcoming Manual, Website, and Continuing the PIE 4.3

 

I apologize for the time lag since my last posting, life tends to get in its own way sometimes but we all do what we have to do. 

Website & Manual: I am building a website for my little consulting firm focusing on the R&D side as well as the PIETECH manual (basically complete, getting finishing touches now). There will also be access to companion videos. That access will only be available with the purchase of a manual. The address to the website is http://www.stclairtech.techit is online now but I hope to have it truly functional in the next 3 weeks.

At this point in time, the manual (and its companion videos) will be the only information that is not completely free. This will hopefully help offset some of those constantly inflating costs.

A Kit?: Another possibility which came to me as a suggestion is that of a functioning miniature model kit. The kit may be a partially assembled, or only contain the finished pieces. That idea is still only on the drawing board for now until the logistics can be fully worked out.

PIE 4.3 Current Progress: I have taken the PIE 4.3 apart to replace the drive pulley with a chain sprocket. This has given me the opportunity to analyze the unit looking for weaknesses and damage.

Disassembled PIE 4.3

Broken Outer Stop

Broken Outer Stop

It is very apparent that the outer stops were the first weak point, and once they would break there was a cascade effect of failures. The weight would, at times, be allowed to collide end first into the inner stop (sun gear axle). This caused enough deflection in the wheel and axle that the planet gear could skip a few teeth and become “out of time” with the assembly. Now that the 4.3 is apart I have found that the wheel is slightly bent (about 3mm or 1/8”) which is not enough to need replacing yet. The axle is also bent, and that is now definitely scrap metal, There are vides posted to YouTube and BitChute describing the process and showing the bent axle. 

YouTube: https://youtu.be/wmoc2-1v43A 

BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/rfK5qGGRDffR/

I have also received 2 new gear-motors for the PIE 4.3 which are all set up to run at approximately 300 RPMs at 24 volts DC. I am seriously considering running 2 wheels, each with their own drive motor. That may be overkill, but right now design simplicity is very important for the purpose of easy transitioning into the testing phase. 

New Motor

It is reasonably simple to set up a chain drive that would spin the wheels in opposite directions (obviously planning opposing wheels) and they would obviously always be in-sync with each other, but there are other testing considerations like running wheels at different speeds and easily being able to reverse either wheel’s rotation.

PIETECH P.4, Coming Soon, a PITECH Builders’ Manual, Also Continuing the PIE 4.3’s Progress

 

PIETECH Manual: There has been a “Manual” in the works for a while now. It is coming together well and once it is completed it should be a valuable resource for anyone wanting to experiment with Inertial Propulsion without spending untold hours with trial and error testing and expensive components that may not be exactly what is necessary. I have several reasonably complete drafts sent out to other people familiar with this technology for their opinions and criticism. Below is a preview shot of the Cover and the Table of Contents as it is right now.

I am hoping to have this available before the end of the year!

PIETECH Manual Cover

There is also a section within the manual that explains the mechanisms which create the driving force in greater detail than has ever been published, to the best of my knowledge. Color photos and detailed instructions means that little or no math is necessary to follow along, build a working PIE 1.0 or 2.0, and gain a better understanding of the inertial propulsion principals proven to work via the PIE.

  
PIETECH Manual TOC 


Continuing on with the PIE 4.3: Now I am preparing to expand the PIE 4.3 into a 2-wheeled unit running in the 200 to 300 RPM range. Tests have proven the possibility of running RPMs in the 850 to 1000 range, but the components would need a pretty severe redesign in order to sustain those RPMs for more than a minute or two, so I am planning on staying under 500 RPMs for now.

Component Failure: The damage from running at full speed (around 875 RPM) is significant. Both outer stops were broken (twice each), and the sprocket gears used as the planet gears have many bent teeth.

Much of that damage was incurred when the outer stop(s) broke and the weight could jam the assembly. That is also when timing would jump.

“Overspeed” Gear Damage

Possible Gear Changes: Notably the sun gear is completely undamaged! Since there is no damage there and considering the severe pounding the gears in the PIE 2.0 suffered with only minor issues (spot welds breaking), I am reluctant to purchase expensive spur gears which will absolutely have weaker teeth than my homemade ones. Better welding, and perhaps a coating should make perfectly acceptable gears that will stand the abuse of slinging the PIE’s weights.

Sprockets for Now: I will probably continue to use the sprockets as planet gears for now, but if they continue having damage issues they will need improvements to minimize the problem.

The sprockets I am using in the PIE 4.3, they are 40A26 sprockets with a 1” center hole. When I weld in the rods, I could skip every other space and that would make 13 tooth gears that would be much stronger and mesh with better precision than just welding rods to a flat pulley.

Those sprockets are very inexpensive from https://www.surpluscenter.com (around $3 US each at this time) and they are easily welded.

40A26 Hubless Sprocket

Adding to the PIE 4.3: I now know for a fact that the PIE 4.3 produces 20 oz. of thrust at 275 RPMs, and it runs smoothly at that speed. A second wheel is being added, and it will need to be timed to the first wheel, so a chain drive is being planned out for the drive. I would ideally be able to test with both synchronized “sympathetic” spin wheels and also test with synchronized but “opposing” spin wheels and switch directions as easily as rerouting the chain and having a second set of weights. Time will tell how that works out.

Wheel Configuration: It is VERY tempting to stack the wheels up for this higher speed unit, like the PIE 2.0, but I think it should be a side-by-side to make the switching of directions as simple as possible. I suppose the question should be regarding the placement of the second wheel. Beside the 1st one or in front of it? Perhaps that is something else that should be “changeable” for experimentation purposes as well…

MORE TO COME SOON

PIETECH V.1, P. 3: PIE 4.3 has a Brand-New Cart, 1st “On-Wheels” Test

 I am now actively conducting thrust tests on the PIE 4.3 with positive results. 

Since it certainly appears to have a lot of propulsive force in bench tests and is rather unruly on the bench, it seems that a heavy and sturdy cart should be used. 

I have modified a steel cart, which I had originally built for an entirely different purpose, just to be the new PIE 4.3’s cart complete with solid solid tires and ball bearing wheels.

 
New Cart With New Wheels

It took several runs at nearly full speed to properly adjust the sun gear for forward thrust without pulling to one side or the other. During those test runs, there was enough force to move the cart forward and slide the wheels sideways approximately 10 inches.

 
Mounting The PIE 4.3 To The New Cart

During those test runs, one outer stop broke and the excessive lash on one of the planet gears caused it to skip timing, but even though weaknesses were obvious the overall test was successful.

PIE 4.3 On Its Wheels After First Round Of Testing

The cart and PIE 4.3 total assembly weight is 130 lbs. New ball bearing wheels with solid rubber tires allow it to roll smoothly on a concrete floor, although some places on my shop floor are better than others. I have several vehicles in different states of disassembly in the shop, so I was limited to a spot where the floor is not quite as smooth so all tests have been repeated in the same “wheel tracks” to be certain that variances in the floor would not skew the numbers. All thrust and resistance tests are being measured using a digital scale.

So, on to the numbers for THIS test sequence.

Unit weight: 130 LBS.

Number of flexplate wheels: 1

Number of weights: 2

Mass of weights: 1.9 OZ.

RPM of flexplate: 275

Rolling resistance “off”: 40 OZ.

Rolling resistance “running”: 20 OZ

Result: 20 OZ of forward thrust – running at 275 RPMs.

PIETECH V.1, P. 2: Redesigned Sun Gear Makes This Model The “PIE 4.3”:

 

Inverted Chain Sun Gear

I am really pleased with the raw power that the PIE 4.0 exhibits. This power is still quite wild and unrefined, but it is impressive, nonetheless.

I was happy with the inverted chain design, but I quickly saw some issues that would give me trouble keeping the PIE running. Mainly the width of the chain is too narrow to allow for wheel run-out and axle deviations. The main wheel is expected to deflect some and I am not using a precision sun gear axle so I have no realistic expectation of it being perfectly straight.

Narrow Chain/Gear Mating Area

Now the sun gear has now been redesigned/improved. It still functions as an inverted chain but rather than roller chain, 8mm (5/16”) rods are used. The new sun gear width is 30mm (1-3/16”) so there is plenty of room to change designs.


Redesigned Sun Gear

The new sun gear is made from two #40-26 tooth sprockets with the teeth cut nearly off and 8mm (5/16”) rods welded into the remaining tooth divots. A piece of 1” steel rod with the center drilled to 5/8” is used for the center of the gear. The sprockets are welded to the center rod and the 5/16” rods ae then welded in place.

Bench testing is showing that adjusting the sun gear’s timing by as little as 1 or 2 teeth (13 to 23 degrees) changes the direction of thrust dramatically. 

Below is a video of the new sun gear set for forward motion and PIE clamped firmly to the bench.

I am planning on doing more extensive testing in the next days and weeks, including the use of an inverter to make the drive portable for vehicle testing!

It has occurred to me that since the PIE 4.0 has already gone through 2 gear redesigns and a motor swap that this is truly the PIE 4.3, so that is what it shall be known as… PIE 4.3!