PIE X Gets a New Name – “The Trammel Engine”

November was a very busy month for Stclairtech R&D, and for the PIE X project!  

Ready For “Public” Testing

So much has been accomplished with the PIE X project it is mind boggling!!! The “backfire” issue has been resolved and there have been some very successful tests completed running with the electric motor.

Some of the highlights are:

The “backfire” problem is now well controlled with a minor design workaround. Future builds will take these backfire control requirements into account so that “workarounds” will be unnecessary.

The PIE X has earned itself a name of its own and is now known as the “Trammel Engine”. It is a name which is both literal and figurative. Literal because it has internals which resemble the operation of an ellipsograph, or “Trammel of Archimedes”, and is a figurative tongue-in-cheek reference to the same machine’s moniker of being a “do-nothing machine” since its purpose seemed nonsensical for the most part.

 The Trammel Engine (T-Engine or TE for short) is now running well enough to perform some rudimentary testing which has demonstrated true linear thrust. It has been measured thrusting upward with a weight scale with an averaged thrust of .7 lbs. and peaks ten-times that amount running at input speeds of no more than 350 RPM.

Unlike the earlier PIE systems based on Thornson technology the T-Engine does not seem to have a low-speed limitation, and it is creating more thrust as RPMs increase.

A few shareable facts (so far):

1- The TE has externally driven mechanical components which are driven via the electric motor(s) and cause overall rotation along with internal rotating components.

2- There are 3 major rotating component assemblies consisting of metal parts using ball-bearings for friction reduction.

3- Some of the pieces of the internal assemblies can be labeled with names resembling those of internal combustion engines. Pistons, connecting rods, camshaft-like parts, and flywheels are just some of those named components.

Overly simplistically stated, it uses something very similar in function to a lever pulling a load which is allowed to move past apex and “snap over center”. This over center, snapping, rotating assembly is moving masses, accelerating, decelerating, and recovering them 4 times per disc rotation.

The internal timing of these components, and the use of a “camshaft-like” sub-assembly is of utmost importance to eliminating the backfire issue!

There are several videos available on YouTube and BitChute, the latest of them (at this writing) is a 2-part set called “Trammel Engine Works Part 1” and “…Part 2”. Part one shows the test rig, and part two shows a “successful” test which ended abruptly when the fuse blew. It turned out that the fuse blew because one of the “connecting rods” broke. Here are those videos below.

Part 1
Part 2

The broken and damaged parts are now being replaced and repaired, there will be more tests to come very soon! And hopefully more can be revealed soon…

PIE 4.8 Changes to SDC and Issues on Latest Test Drive

New SDC Switch

It has been a very busy several weeks since I have had opportunity to update this blog. Work and life have been very busy and work on the PIE has been slow.

The re-phased PIE 4.8 has had the first road test completed with no SDC as the SDC micro switch is a continuous source of problems. The lever on the switch tends to break or get bent very easily and the roller wheel also tends to fall off frequently, so it was decided to use a “proximity switch” as a non-contact alternative. The switch chosen is a magnetic switch used for building security systems as a door/window open/close sensor. This is easily activated by mounting magnets instead of mechanical actuators and this works very well.

The PIE 4.8 second test drive was, however, less than outstanding. The re-phased PIE wheels and SDC “should” have yielded much better results than the previously phased tests when it was set up for “self-propulsion”, but the results were very disappointing as the engine load reduction was only in the 4% to 6% range.

I believe it has to do with the counter rotation of the wheels. The “zone of thrust” or “thrust zone” on a single wheel is rather wide as it pulls forward through a good 45 degrees of the rotation, by having the counter rotating wheel, the “thrust zone” is effectively narrowed but instead of “focusing” thrust, it only eliminates part of it.

The next steps to calculate the reason for such failure will be to adjust phasing back to synchronous and increase pulse torque by removing one weight from each wheel. The thrust will alternate between the CW and the CCW wheel, this should demonstrate the theory of the wide thrust angle vs. narrowing the zone.

Phased Back and Switched Down to Two Planet Gears

The non-functioning weight is being used as a balance weight. The planet gear that is not being used is removed and the weight is bolted to the wheel in its place which balances the wheels enough to keep it from tearing itself apart.

One Planet Gear Removed and the Weight Used for Balancing Wheel

If this works out, the plan is to reverse the rotation of one of the wheels and repeating tests with co-rotating wheels to increase thrust without narrowing the “thrust zone”.

Ready For Road Test Set #4

On a side note, I believe the thrust zone will automatically be much more condensed (thus stronger) with a different design. Perhaps the PIE X will accomplish this.

PIE 4.7 and “PIE X”

PIETECH 4.7 and “PIE X”:

It has been a while since my last post, or video so here is an update:

The PIE 4.7 second half (CCW wheel) is progressing, although somewhat slower than I would prefer as life’s circumstances have presented certain obstacles to its advancement. The first “dead blow” weight for it is ready to install, and another is in process.

I always said it is not a good idea to have more than one project going at a time, yet that is exactly what I am doing…

After communicating at length with other builders, I have split my time between the PIE 4.7 and a new design, the “PIE X”. It has some radically different internal components and will look a bit different but it is still what I would call a Pulsed Inertial Engine, so right now it is known as the “PIE X”.

This design has originated from other people so I will need their permission to “open source” any of that information! I require their permission to share or publish the information leading up to the PIE X without the consent of those who have been kind enough to share the basic design information with me!

If the PIE X is as feasible as predicted and becomes something worth pursuing more information may be provided (with permission), and if it falls short, I will provide thoughts regarding that failure (still, with permission only).

Note: The PIE X is quite a bit more expensive and much more complex to build and fabricate the components for, so it may not be something the casual hobbyist would feel comfortable with, at least not until there is a working prototype to prove the principals.

Those who know me and those who have followed along with my PIE/PIETECH projects know that I do not randomly spout “theory”. I only present factual information so until I have an experimental prototype, I would not request permission to elaborate any technical information. I only mention the PIE X as an ongoing project because it does slow the PIE 4.7 project and has pushed back the timetable to begin full testing. I am hoping to be performing “on road” testing of the PIE 4.7 by early June which gives me about 8 weeks.

I hope to be posting photos and videos VERY soon, so right now I need to go get busy, I have a PIE 4.7 to finish building and a PIE X to get underway!

PIE 4.7, Testing & Neg. Comments, PIETECH P.15

The last round of single-wheel PIE 4.7 testing is done and the video has been posted. I videoed the testing in multiple “takes” due to time constraints. There are more videos that “could” have been taken, but I chose to forgo the videoing of tests with little or no result differences (I get too long-winded as it is).

There have been some video comments stating in various ways that because it is not a fully successful propulsion engine, that the project should be scrapped, and I should re-focus my energy into more conventional technologies… Everyone is entitled to their opinions. I suppose I could easily get indignant and respond with an expression reflecting that inflamed “knee jerk” emotional response, but there is no point. If watchers do not like what they see, there are plenty of other things to watch so apparently there was enough interest to post a public comment.

I created a post a few days ago, but I have not posted it, primarily because of what is some passive-aggressive contact from a handful of people. I have decided not to let this discourage the public furthering of the PIE project and that post is included in its entirety and without editing after this one, posted as its own post as was originally intended.

Note: I am, from now on, choosing to link and embed videos from BitChute (and maybe others too) rather than YouTube. With the censorship being displayed at YouTube, how long will it be before my videos are labeled as something needing censorship too?

PIE 4.7 Single Wheel With Multiple Configurations

PIE 4.7 – Now with Two Weights and Actuators, PIETECH P. 15

A second weight has now been put together for the PIE 4.7. It is .02kg heavier than the first weight, but that can be corrected (if necessary) by drilling shallow holes in the weight until corrected. The weight of each is 2kg +/-.

PIE 4.7 with Dual Weights and Actuators

Two SDC actuators are installed. They are each 8 inches long and are attached to the main wheel’s outer ring gear with ¼” beam clamps from the local hardware store.

New Controls

Additionally, the SDC potentiometer “pot” is installed next to the main speed control pot on the motor speed controller, a mini toggle switch was added to turn on or off the SDC function, and finally a main-power toggle switch was added between the battery and speed controller.

Bench testing is showing a most definite power output increase across the board when the SDC is on compared to tests without it. It seems that because of the improvements made, the PIE 4.7 (with its one wheel and two weights) is comparable to the PIE 2.1 which is twice its size. Proper testing will be done in the next week or so, then we will know for sure.

Fastened to the Bench & Back to Simple Chain Drive

A video is posted to both the YouTube and BitChute channels giving a quick tour of the PIE 4.7 and then a demo with it firmly attached to the bench.

Disassembled/Reassembled PIE 4.7 – Dual Actuator First Bench Test

PIETECH Page 9 – PIE 4.5 With New Dead Blow Type Weight

The latest test of the PIE 4.5 is using a 1 kg dead blow type weight. The weight is a steel box with steel shot (BB’s) inside it. It appears to have a lot of promise, as there is virtually no “bounce” when the weight hits the inner stop, and it seems to be dampened where it would contact the outer stop if it had one (has not been installed).

PIE 4.5 with Dead Blow
Dead Blow Weight Installed On PIE 4.5

There is a video of this first testing on YouTube and BitChute. The problem however remained that the centrifugal force and impact force did not push in the same direction, which was the reason for Thornson’s “Inner Planet Trap” which would hold the weight and release at the correct time.

The answer is to install a “guide” on the end of the weight which would keep the weight near the center axle and correct the problem of thrusting in two different directions. This is proving , so far, to be a much improved design. This can also be seen on YouTube and BitChute.

Guide Fastened to Dead Blow Weight

These improvements are now bringing the PIE version up to “PIE 4.6”.

PIE 4.6 – Dead Blow Weight and Guide

Check out the videos on YouTube and BitChute & thanks for watching!

https://www.youtube.com/user/stclairtechrd

https://www.bitchute.com/channel/miGkQfBM24NZ/